Bar Exam: First Recap

Leave a comment

Hello All,

Congratulations on completing one of the last three day bar exams in the country! (More on the upcoming changes to the California bar exam in another post).

CAVEAT: I have not seen the essays and so my comments here are based solely upon examinees’s reports. Still, the more I hear, the more I am able to piece together and I think it is certainly safe to say that if you took today’s exam, then you know that Contracts featured prominently.

In fact, the question of the day today was this: “Did I really just see two Contracts essays?” Well, yes, yes you did.

If you read my post on Tuesday, you may recall that I mentioned that you should not put any of the topics that were tested on Tuesday’s essays away. This is because the bar examiners have been known to test the same essay topic on more than one essay out of the six essays. Yes, two essays on the same topic – with some variations, sure – but still the same topic on two separate essays.

So, while I think that most were not expecting to see two Contracts essays on day three, Contracts has shown up on two out of the six essays before. (Incidentally, so too has Professional Responsibility and Evidence).  Still, today was not likely what most examinees were expecting. So, I wanted to weigh in tonight to simply put you at ease and confirm that yes, it appears that Contracts appeared on more than one of today’s three essays. One of the Contracts essays tested the Common Law of Contracts (among other issues) and the other tested the Uniform Commercial Code. Again, understand that I have not seen the exam and so I am relying solely upon reports from examinees. Remedies was also tested along with what appears to have been a fairly straightforward Evidence essay.

So, this guru’s “predictions” were six for six. I am pleased with that.

If you would like to provide more detail, you can do so by leaving a comment here on my blog or by emailing me at: barexamguru@yahoo.com

I am waiting on more reports about the exam before I say much more. I am also waiting for the exam to actually be over with – remember that some examinees have accommodations that allow for time and a half or double time. This means that for some examinees the exam goes on for six days. Since there are still examinees sitting for the bar exam through this Sunday, I will postpone any discussion of the performance test until next week out of respect for the exam and the process.

I did, however, want to simply say that yes, Contracts appears to have made an appearance on two of today’s three essays. And as was expected, Remedies and Evidence were also tested. I will write more after I hear more.

Congratulations again on completing the exam and all the best of luck to those who are still taking the exam over the next few days!

Lisa Duncanson
Founder/Program Director
Bar Exam Cram Session and Bar None Review
barexamguru@yahoo.com
(213) 529-0990
http://www.barexamcramsession.com and http://www.barnonereview.com

California Bar Exam: Day Three!

Leave a comment

Congratulations, you are almost done with the California bar exam! Right now examinees are one performance test away from the finish line. Maybe this afternoon’s PT will have some Constitutional Law on it . . . I don’t know of course, but since we thought it might repeat on the essays, maybe it will show up this afternoon. The good news is that it doesn’t matter what it tested on the pt as it is a closed universe, everything you need is there, kind of exam. The biggest challenge is simply moving through the materials in a timely fashion so that you get to writing and have time to write the document or documents you are asked to prepare. Choose to finish on time, keep close watch of the time throughout the three hours you are allotted and make sure that you allow enough time to write your answer. Remember, the examiners will only grade what they see – so make sure you have enough time to write!

Remember to stay positive and write your heart out! Thank you again for following my blog!

Wishing everyone all the best of luck this afternoon!

Lisa Duncanson
Founder/Program Director
Bar Exam Cram Session and Bar None Review
barexamguru@yahoo.com
(213) 529-0990
http://www.barexamcramsession.com and http://www.barnonereview.com

Performance Test: Last Minute Tips!

4 Comments

Hello All,

Congratulations, you are three essays and one performance test away from being done with the California Bar Exam!

Please refer to my two earlier “predictions” posts for advice on tomorrow’s essays. If you have been following my blog, you will know that I do not claim to be able to predict the essays. I did have some very good predictions for day one (as in it was pretty close to what showed up). But, obviously the bar examiners can test anything tomorrow. So please do not assume that since the predictions were very close on day one’s essays, that tomorrow’s essays will prove to be as much of a match up. I would take a look at my predictions for examples of essay scenarios that could come up and I would also review any area of law that feels uncomfortable for you or that you think you might not remember (regardless of whether it is something I have “predicted” or not).

I want to wish you all the very best of luck on tomorrow’s exam. If you are new to my blog, I suggest reviewing the “predictions” posts from February 17th and 18th as well as yesterday’s post.

And now some last minute tips for the performance test:

1. Follow the instructions carefully! Exam pressure can lead to missing things and to misreading instructions – so slow it down enough to make sure you are not missing something in the instructions. You are going to base your whole answer on your interpretation of the senior partner memo (the letter to you from your would be boss) –so make certain you read it very carefully and more than once! (See more on following instructions, and evidencing that you have followed instructions, in # 2 below).

With respect to following instructions, do so to a T. If the senior partner memo tells you not to write a statement of facts, then do not write a statement of facts. Pay close attention to the instructions you are provided. Failure to adhere closely to these instructions will cost you dearly – so be careful!  Examinees are often in a rush to get through the materials quickly and end up missing something in the instructions, failing to pick up some of the easier points. So make sure you read through the senior partner memo a few times and be certain about what you are being asked to do.

2. Make your answer look like it is an answer to that particular performance test. Whatever you are asked to do on the performance test, make sure that you create a document that looks like what you were asked to produce. There will typically be two places from which to obtain your format and instructions for the document you are asked to prepare. The first source is the from the senior partner memo (the letter to you from your would be boss). The second source is also in the case file portion of your performance test and it is a firm wide memo (usually with the title: “To all associates . . .”) that provides instructions on how to write an appellate brief or a memorandum (or whatever it is that you are being asked to write). It is critical that you refer to both of these sources to make certain that you include all sections that you are supposed to include (assuming there are sections, i.e., statement of facts, or point headings, etc.) in your document.

These two sources will also help you to format and organize your document – for example, if you are asked to write a memorandum about the the Constitutionality of a proposed ordinance, then a) you need to make sure that your document is identified as a “memorandum” and b) you need to make certain that your document visually makes it clear that you are in fact addressing the constitutionality of a proposed ordinance. This may seem obvious and it may seem less important than figuring out what the cases mean, but the reality is that many examinees simply fail to do some of these very basic things and end up losing points. So, make certain that you do not forget to make your performance test answer look like it is the very document that you have been asked to produce.

3. How do I know which cases to use? Use them all if you can. Seriously. Really. Do not be afraid. Try to find a use for each case. That is it.

4. What part of the statutes should I include? Assuming you have statutes (not all performance tests do) then look to see which parts of the statutes are referred to in the cases. It is a pretty safe bet that you should also use the sections that the cases refer to as well.

5. Use headings. (first make sure you follow any format that you are instructed to follow). Always err on the side of following instructions. Some of your formatting will likely come from the instructions (either from the senior partner memo and/or potentially from a firm wide, memo to “all associates” in the case file). Remember that your performance test answer (whether it is a memorandum, a points and authorities, an appellate brief, a letter to a client, a closing or opening argument) it is still an exam answer. It will be graded by a human being and you need to be cognizant of that – make it easy to read and easy to follow. Use headings.

6. What if I don’t finish my answer? This is not an option. You need to make certain that you do finish your answer. Just do it. I take my job very seriously and I work hard, I go the distance, I do whatever it takes to get whatever I need done. Why am I telling you this? Because you should too – you should work your butt off and I don’t just mean in your preparation for the bar exam – but I mean right now, right now on this test, today. Suck it up and get through it. I know that sounds a bit harsh, but if you want to pass this thing then go after it, especially in these last hours. Insist on finishing today’s performance test – because you can and because you need to.

7. Okay, but what if I don’t finish my answer? Sigh. Okay, if you see that you are not going to finish what you had planned on writing, then adapt and do so quickly. The clock may not be your friend, but it does not have to be your enemy either. Watch it, keep track of your time. Don’t wait for the proctor to provide a time warning for you to know how much time you have left to finish. Keep track of your time and speed things up as you need to in order to finish your answer. And, if you are really up against the wall, then make it look like you have finished. If it is appropriate for the document that you are writing, then add a heading for “conclusion” and have a few sentences or a paragraph summarizing as best you can what you have written. And, you can even pre-write a conclusion if you think it will help (this is really only helpful to laptop examinees).

8. Be POSITIVE! (I know, how nice of me to yell at you to be positive :)) Seriously though, please do not be miserable – it will only hurt your performance. No one forced you to go to law school (well, I hope not). You presumedly wanted to do this, you want to be a lawyer. Therefore, today is about doing what you want to be doing – taking and passing the bar exam. Be proud of all the hard work you put in to get to where you are right now. So many people say things like: “I was going to go to law school” or “I always wanted to go to law school” . . . well you did go to law school. Be proud of that and don’t let the struggle of the bar exam take any of that away from you. Now go kick the bar exam’s butt!

All the best of luck tomorrow!

Please let me know if this blog helped you, I would love to hear from you: barexamguru@yahoo.com

Lisa Duncanson

Founder/Program Director
Bar Exam Cram Session and Bar None Review
(213) 529-0990
http://www.barexamcramsession.com and http://www.barnonereview.com

California Bar Exam: Good Luck and Thank You!

2 Comments

Hello all,

I wanted to take a moment to thank you for following my blog. To date, we have had nearly 800,000 views. I am humbled and grateful for the following.

I thoroughly enjoy teaching and helping examinees pass the bar exam. It is something that I find very rewarding. I also really enjoy being able to reach a broader audience through this blog. Many of you have never heard of our bar review courses. And that is okay, it has never been our goal to be the next one size, fits all, “big box” bar review course (in fact, far from). I have been doing bar prep since 1996 and have always taught live classes because I believe that is where the best learning occurs. I also believe that we should all do something to help others – it truly makes the world a better place. I am grateful to have this forum to share insights, tips and provide some guidance to those taking the bar exam.

Thank you again for following the blog. I hope that you find the tips and downloads helpful. And, if you do, please let others know about this blog.

Best of luck to you on day two and day three!  And stay tuned for continued posts.

Sincerely,

Lisa Duncanson
Bar Exam Guru
213-529-0990

 

Day One of the California Bar Exam

Leave a comment

Hello All,

Congratulations on completing day one of the bar exam!

I have heard about the main areas of testing for today’s exams. So far, the topics tested on the essay were subjects on my list of predicted areas. As a result, I do not have any real changes to my predictions. But, I do have a few thoughts based upon the topics that were tested today.

Also, for more tips and insights, be sure to sign up for the Bar Exam Tips List here.

So here are my thoughts . . .

You are likely to see more MBE topics tested on day three’s essays
Generally, each bar exam you will see at least two or three (sometimes more) of the MBE topics tested on the essays. Today, based upon what I have heard, so far there was only on MBE topic tested (Torts). Therefore, I would not be surprised if you see two or more MBE topics on Thursday. I am still sticking to my list of predictions. (See my two previous posts, Predictions Part One and Predictions Part Two)

I still think that you will see something else repeat from the July 2015 bar exam. Remember that each bar round the examiners usually repeat two to three subjects from the prior bar exam round. I still feel that Evidence or Criminal Law murder (possibly crossed with Criminal Procedure), or a repeat of Constitutional Law (in the areas that I have already suggested) or possibly a repeat of Property (in the areas that I have already suggested). Contracts and or Contracts Remedies is also possible. I am not saying that you will see all of these areas. In fact, that would be very unlikely. I am suggesting that I think some of what you will see on day three will come from the remaining “predicted” areas that were not tested on today’s exam. Keep in mind that anything could be tested.

Don’t put away the subjects that were tested today
In addition, I want to caution you that sometimes we see subjects from day one’s testing repeat on day three. For example, we have seen Torts tested on day one and then show up on a cross-over with Contracts and Remedies on day three. I am not saying this is a great likelihood, but it has happened and you should be aware of this. It never feels good to put a subject away – thinking it will not be tested again – and then seeing it on an essay. So just be sure to still take a look at Torts briefly. The same is true for Professional Responsibility. It has shown up on past bar exams not only an essay and the PT on day one, but then a third time on an essay on day three. Again, not my first pick of what will happen, but you should be aware that it could happen.

Put today behind you!
Whatever you did today, however you felt about your performance today, it is over, history. There is no point in dwelling on it and there is no point in rehashing it. Do your best to put it out of your mind. We are often our own worst critics. If you have your doubts about today’s performance, I encourage you to put that behind you. You likely did better than you think. And, thinking that you did not do well is not going to improve your chances of doing well tomorrow or Thursday. So Put today behind you.

How should you study for Thursday?
I do recommend studying tomorrow for Thursday’s essays. However, no extreme late night studying as it is important to get some rest if you can. That being said, I have never slept much at all the night before days of the bar exam. But, I did not spend the whole night studying – I still rested my eyes and brain and did my best to try to sleep. Some review is a good idea, just don’t pull an all-nighter. You will perform far better on Thursday if you get some rest. Also, remember that you know this stuff. Basically you do. Tell yourself this and it will help your confidence tomorrow and Thursday.

I will post more tomorrow. Also, as I hear further details about what was tested on day one, I may update my predictions. For now, however, I am sticking with my original “predictions” – remember, I no one can predict this exam. I certainly can’t. I simply think it is helpful to be reminded of essay scenarios that might come up. If nothing else, it can serve to calm your nerves.

If you have any questions about the exam, feel free to email me at: barexamguru@yahoo.com and I will do my best to get back to you.

Congratulations again on your completion of day one of the bar exam!

All the best,

Lisa Duncanson
Bar None Review
213-529-0990

Bar Exam Predictions: Part Two

2 Comments

Hello all,

Here is part two of my “predictions” – be sure to read my earlier post for part one of my predictions. Again, I do not claim to be able to predict what will be on the bar exam. However, I do think that it can be helpful, especially in these final days leading up to the bar exam, to consider potential essay scenarios. As I mentioned in my earlier post, these “predictions” are based upon what has and has not been tested in recent years as well as my review of the history of essay testing on the California bar exam. See below for the remaining topics that are possible on the February 2016 bar exam. Please bear in mind that anything could be tested. It is not a good idea to assume that a topic will not come up on the exam. Be prepared for any subject!

Torts – As I mentioned yesterday, I think you could see either Torts or Contracts. I also think that Remedies is likely as it is tested heavily on the California bar exam (see my earlier post, Part One). While any area of Torts could be tested, it makes sense to look at what is the most common area for testing as well as what we have not seen tested in some time. The most common area of testing in Torts is negligence. Areas of Torts that have not been tested in some time include: products liability and strict liability. Torts remedies is also possible or perhaps in one of the miscellaneous Tort areas like Abuse of Process and Malicious Prosecution or Nuisance. If you were to see Nuisance, then you would likely also have coverage of Remedies. Be sure to have both a basic approach for Tort Remedies (1. Damages, 2. Restitution and 3. Injunctive relief) as well as knowing the specific types of Tort Damages, Restitutionary Remedies and the elements of Injunction).

Possibly Contracts or Contract Remedies – Know your Contracts approach up through Remedies. Be prepared for an exam dealing with the UCC. I say this not because it is the most likely essay scenario, but because when it is tested examinees often struggle with how to answer a UCC exam. Therefore, you will want to make sure that you are comfortable with how this is tested. Sure, you need to know the rules. But, most examinees who take the bar (pass or fail) know the rules. Make sure that in addition to knowing the rules that you know how the bar examiners test the subjects on the essays. For example, review a UCC exam so that you can see how it is answered and see what the examiners embrace.

The examiners have not tested the issue of a “hybrid” contract on the exam in some time. This issue comes up when it is unclear whether the contract on your fact pattern is governed by the Common Law or the UCC. This occurs where a significant or important part of the contract is a service and a significant or important part of the contract is a moveable tangible good. What the bar examiners want you to do in this situation is to discuss – right after “choice of law” – hybrid contract and apply the “predominant purpose” test.

Past examples of a hybrid contract on the California bar exam have included the following: Buyer contracts with Seller to purchase a turbine (a moveable, tangible good – for which the UCC would apply). Buyer agrees to a purchase price of $60,000.00. In addition to purchasing the turbine from buyer, buyer agrees to install the turbine on a platform in the Atlantic Ocean. Seller is not the only seller of turbines. But, Seller is the only company that can install the turbine in the Atlantic Ocean (the installation part of the contract is a service – governed by the Common Law of Contracts). Seller agrees to install the turbine for $20,000.00.

This scenario (while not tested often) has not been tested in some time on the California bar exam. As a result, it is worth some thought. Should you see something like this on your exam, do not try to force the right answer. Instead, show the bar examiners that you see the issue and that you understand that either the Common Law of Contracts or the UCC could ultimately govern the contract. The right answer will be that you consider both options by applying the predominant purpose test. Weigh the possibility of each and then come to a conclusion.

Once you address the hybrid contract issue, then you should approach the rest of the essay as though it were a UCC exam (where you discuss both the common law and the UCC – for examples of this, review any past Contracts UCC exam and you will see what you need to do). Most Contracts essays do not involve a hybrid contract issue. However, since it has not been tested in some time, it is a good idea to keep it in mind. Equally likely, I think, could be a fairly straight forward common law Contracts essay where formation is at issue, breach and then remedies.

Remember that any topic could be tested – including topics that were tested on the July 2015 bar exam. In fact, on most bar exam administrations, two or more topics will repeat from one bar exam to the next. As a result, you should not dismiss subjects that were tested in July.

If Property were to repeat: Property was tested on the July 2015 bar exam. If property is tested you should be aware that LandLord/Tenant is one of the most common areas for testing. However, we have not seen testing of easements in some time. Easements can be tested in the context of landlord/tenant or in the context of a landsale contract. If you were to see the latter, you would likely be called upon to discuss, notice (actual, constructive and inquiry) and possibly the covenants of a general warranty deed.

If Criminal Procedure were to repeat – As mentioned in my earlier post, Criminal Procedure could come up as a cross-over with Criminal Law (Murder). Be sure to read my earlier post.

If Civil Procedure were to repeat – Bear in mind that the most common areas for testing in Civil Procedure include jurisdiction – both personal jurisdiction and subject matter jurisdiction. While jurisdictional issues could easily repeat, if you do see Civil Procedure on the exam, you may see areas that have not been tested in some time: these include: Class Actions, Notice and Code pleading distinctions (if tested this would be a tack on issue, not the whole essay. Remember that Federal courts follow Notice pleading and CA follows Code or Fact Pleading). Other testable tack on issues include: remititur and additur and the 7th Amendment right to a jury trial.

I will continue to post up through the bar exam.

Be sure to sign up for the tips list.

All the best in your studies and on the exam!

Sincerely,

Lisa Duncanson
Bar Exam Guru

213-529-0990
barexamguru@yahoo.com

Bar Exam Predictions: Part One

Leave a comment

Hello All,

Thank you for following the blog and for your patience this February regarding the expected Bar Exam Predictions. We had a record turn out in our class sessions and this “guru” has been very busy. Also, please understand that my enrolled students expect me to provide the predictions to them first. I hope that you find the materials available on thisblog helpful (see some of the “freestuff” if you haven’t already, for downloads).

Also, be sure to join our Bar Exam Tips List for additional tips and handouts, sign up here.

About my “predictions” I do not claim to be able to predict what will be tested on the California bar exam. Nor do I recommend that you study based upon anyone’s predictions. However, I do think it can be helpful to know of some possible essay scenarios when going into the bar exam. I base the essay scenarios that I come up with upon the following: 1) historically favorite areas of testing by the California Bar Examiners, 2) areas that have not been tested on the bar exam for some time (Criminal Law MURDER, for example) and 3) just my gut and my experience with the exam over the past twenty plus years.

This is PART ONE of my “predictions” – PART TWO will be a separate post tomorrow.

What I think is very possible to show up on the exam: First of all, you should know (if you do not already) that any topic can be tested on the essays AND that generally at least two topics (and I don’t just mean Professional Responsibility) will repeat from one bar exam round to the very next. And, some topics repeat three or more times back to back. My point: you should not dismiss any topic because it was already tested on the past two or even three bar exams.

Constitutional Law as a possible repeat topic – Constitutional Law was on the July 2015 bar exam. However, I think that Constitutional Law may be more likely to repeat since the testing of this subject last bar round was so narrow (regulatory takings) leaving most all areas untested. If Constitutional Law were to repeat, possible tested areas could include the Dormant Commerce Clause (as this has not been tested in years) or possibly the First Amendment (as this is one of the more heavily tested areas within Constitutional Law and is tested frequently).

What scenario generates a Dormant Commerce Clause issue? When you see a fact pattern with a state law that as applied treats out-of-staters differently than in-staters or taxes an activity that affects interstate commerce. The main issue will be whether or not the state law places an undue burden on interstate commerce. Remember that you will need to address the state’s power to act (under the powers reserved to the state via the 10th Amendment – that the state may regulate on behalf of Safety, Health, Welfare, Education and Morals of their citizens).

If you were to see an essay that tests the Dormant Commerce Clause you should be aware that this same essay could also generate issues in the following areas: 1) State action, 2) 11th Amendment Immunity (this would be a very brief discussion/mention on your exam), 3) Article III Case or Controversy requirements, 4) Substantive and Procedural Due Process 3) Privileges and Immunities (this is usually a brief discussion, if it comes up at all) and 5) a potential Contracts Clause violation. If you would like to see an example of a Dormant Commerce Clause exam testing some of these issues, be sure to join our bar exam tips list.

Professional Responsibility (areas that have not been tested in some time include: advertising rules, sexual relations with client, rules on perjury and rules for turning over evidence – for example a gun, or the whereabouts of a gun, given to attorney by client. Be sure to be able to note the ABA Rules and California distinction here. In addition, if you see an issue with respect to an a client giving their attorney evidence from a crime or telling the attorney the whereabouts of evidence of a crime – you should also address the tension between the duty of candor owed to the tribunal and the duty to keep client confidences and explain how this is resolved.

Always in Professional Responsibility you should be prepared to discuss the issue of an attorney’s withdrawal- when must an attorney withdraw, when may an attorney withdraw and how must an attorney withdraw properly (assuming the attorney may withdraw in the first place). In addition, always be sure to address any potential and actual conflicts on your exam (an example that has not been tested in some time is where a third party pays the attorney’s fees – for example: Mother pays for son’s legal fees – first this is generally discussed as a potential conflict. When and if it becomes an actual conflict – you should discuss the actual conflict).

Evidence – Evidence was not tested on the July 2015 bar exam. As a result, many are predicting this subject. Evidence could be tested as a full essay or as a cross-over or both. Be prepared for the possibility of a transcript style Evidence essay. Remember if you see this type of Evidence exam that you need to look to discuss form objections (For example: leading, non-responsive, etc.) and also, since it is a racehorse exam, you will likely need to discuss relevance in a somewhat truncated way.

While transcript style essays are not as common, this format has not been tested in some time and is therefore due. Be prepared to address form objections and all areas of Evidence, know your approach. Hearsay is of course the most commonly tested essay area of evidence. Other commonly tested areas within Evidence: Spousal and Marital Communications Privilege. Know all hearsay exceptions. Judicial Notice has not been tested in some time. This could show up as a short call or issue on your exam.

Evidence as a cross-over topic – Evidence is also possible as a cross-over with with any essay subject – including community property, wills (if so, then it would likely be marital and spousal privilege with the CA distinctions) or even a hearsay issue.

Criminal Law/Murder – It has been some time since the bar examiners have tested murder. Typically murder is tested in conjunction with Criminal Procedure, but can also be tested with other topics. I believe Criminal Procedure is a likely repeat topic from the July 2015 bar exam as it would be a good cross-over topic in the event you were to be tested on Criminal Law Murder. Be prepared for a repeat of a 4th Amendment issue (because the examiners certainly could repeat this) but more likely you may see a 5th, 6th and/or 8th Amendment issue crossed over with a murder exam. Evidence can also be tested in the Criminal Law context. If you do see this, be sure to mention Proposition 8, that it applies in California Criminal cases (this is typically just a mention on your exam – but only in the criminal context and only if you are being tested in evidence).

Wills/Trusts – Wills and Trusts could show up as a cross-over or you could see either topic tested separately. Understand there is no guarantee that these topics will show up. Things to remember about Wills and Trusts: both topics have a formation component as part of the approach. One area that is a favorite for testing within the area of Trusts are issues with respect to Trustee duties. In Wills issues with respect to omitted heirs, pretermitted heirs are very commonly tested. Wills formation issues come up and often require a discussion of dependent relative revocation – be prepared to discuss this issue when you see more than one will on your fact pattern.

Remedies – Either in Contracts or Torts. More on these topics tomorrow, but be on the look out for Torts Strict Liability (products liability or abnormally dangerous activities – again, more on this tomorrow). I think either Contracts or Torts could be tested and feel each is equally likely. Remedies is very likely to show up as it is tested frequently and could easily come up in conjunction with Torts or Contracts.

Stay tuned for PART TWO of my “predictions” tomorrow.

Remember, anything can be tested.

I love helping people pass the California bar exam. Be sure to sign up for the tips list.

All the best in your studies and on the exam!

Sincerely,

Lisa Duncanson
Bar Exam Guru

213-529-0990
barexamguru@yahoo.com